Archive for April, 2010

David Petersen FINALLY Knows Who I Am!

Wednesday, April 28th, 2010

At C2E2 in Chicago I had a chance to meet David Petersen, the creator of “Mouse Guard”. Again. And when I stopped by his booth to say hello (for the third year in a row), he had no idea who I was. Again.

George R. Martin tried to cheer me up. “I’ve met Stan Lee five times,” he told me, “and never remembers me.” This time, during a panel talk, I asked those present to stop by Petersen’s booth and tell him what I do. The next day, when I asked Peterson to autograph a copy of his role playing game I said, “Could you make it out to Max?” And he responded with, “Would that be Max Brooks who writes the zombie books?” Victory!

G.I JOE: HEARTS AND MINDS

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

My new mini-series from IDW comes out this May. This is my first collaboration with artists Howard Chaykin and Antonio Fuso. It’s five issues, each issue has two stories, one Joe, one Cobra. Each story examines some aspect of their past, their military specialty or their personal philosophy of life. We deal with issues like torture, poverty, suicide, human evolution, medical malpractice, morality vs science, and Sensory Integration Dysfunction. If I had a chance to sit down with these characters and say “Tell me about yourself”, this mini-series would be the answer. It’s called “Hearts and Minds”, and although there aren’t any zombies, I hope you’ll enjoy it.

G.I Joe

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010

G.I. Joe

G.I. Joe Hearts and Minds

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010
Hearts and Minds

Hearts and Minds

G.I. Joe Hearts and Minds

Tuesday, April 20th, 2010
Hearts and Minds

Hearts and Minds

THE US NAVAL WAR COLLEGE

Monday, April 12th, 2010

Last December I was invited to speak at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. The commandant, Admiral Wisecup recently began a book club among the student body and chose “World War Z” as his inaugural book. My day began with a tour of the campus and war gamming facility, followed by a brief talk then Q and A with the students. The experience was truly an honor, especially for someone like me who is, in the words of Peter Ustinov in Spartacus; “more of a civilian than most civilians”.